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UCGia Bible Insights Thursday, December 23 2021

When it seems God doesn't hear or answer

God does not always answer our prayers to our immediate satisfaction and instantly deliver us from our trials. But He will always do what is best for us as an example from the life of the Apostle Paul illustrates.

The Apostle Paul pleaded with God to intervene for him in a chronic trial. "There was given me a thorn in my flesh, a messenger of Satan, to torment me. Three times I pleaded with the Lord to take it away from me" (2 Corinthians 12:7-8).

There are indications from what Paul wrote to the Galatians that this trial may have been a problem with his eyesight: "...if you could have done so, you would have torn out your eyes and given them to me" (Galatians 4:5). At the end of this letter he also writes, "See what large letters I use as I write to you with my own hand!" (Galatians 6:11).

Several years later Paul wrote he had pleaded with God on three occasions to have his "thorn in the flesh" removed, no doubt with fasting and heartfelt prayer (2 Corinthians 11:27), so he could continue to spread the Gospel effectively and care for the congregations. But God told Paul: "My grace is sufficient for you, for My strength is made perfect in weakness" (2 Corinthians 12:9).

Whether God spoke these words directly to Paul or Paul gradually came to this understanding of God's will isn't clear. What is clear is that Paul eventually saw that his weakness drew him closer to God, and he developed a deeper spiritual understanding that strengthened his faith and commitment: "I am therefore happy to boast of my weaknesses, because then the power of Christ will rest upon me. So I am content with a life of weakness, insult, hardship, persecution, and distress, all for Christ's sake; for when I am weak, then I am strong" (1 Corinthians 12:9-10).

Paul's experience stands as an important spiritual lesson for us. Sometimes God's answer for us is "no" or "not yet." Our physical bodies were never intended to last forever (Psalms 90:10), and God is far more concerned we develop righteous character and a trusting relationship with Him. He wants to resurrect us to eternal life in an immortal spirit body (1 Corinthians 15:40-54), and He promises He will never allow us to fall into trials greater than we can endure or allow us to be tempted beyond what we can bear (1 Corinthians 10:13).

Jesus, knowing He faced a cruel death within a few hours prayed, "...if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me" (Matthew 26:39), but also acknowledged a greater purpose for His physical life, concluding, "Nevertheless, not My will, but Yours, be done" (Luke 22:42). Jesus Christ, the perfect example of faith, knew the importance of following the Father's will above one's own.

Because God works with us to build faith and character He doesn't always answer our prayers in the way we desire and Hebrews 11, known as the “faith chapter,” gives examples of this. God knows what is best for us in the long run, even if it may conflict with our short-term wants and desires.



Herod had ruled the province of Judea, which encompassed most of the geographical areas of the former kingdoms of Israel and Judah, for almost 40 years at the time Jesus Christ was born, with secular history and archaeology confirming his reign (Matthew 2:1-3, 7-8).




He was a great builder, initiating construction projects in at least 20 cities or towns in Israel and more than 10 in foreign cities: "Archaeological excavations have uncovered a surprisingly large amount of evidence pertaining to Herod the Great ....an Idumean who, in 41 B.C., was granted provisional rule of Galilee by Mark Antony [the friend of Julius Caesar and Cleopatra´s last lover] .... In 30 B.C. Octavian (Caesar Augustus) affirmed Herod's rule over Judea, Samaria, and Galilee .... Herod remained in power until his death in 4 B.C…." (Archaeology and the New Testament, 1997, p. 91).




But Herod was not just known for his great building, political and military skills, but also for his great cruelty. The Bible records his utter disregard for human life by describing his reaction to the birth of Jesus. When his scheme to identify the newborn Messiah failed (verses 7-8, 12), Herod lashed out with great violence: "Then Herod … sent forth and put to death all the male children who were in Bethlehem and in all its districts, from two years old and under [the approximate age of Jesus], according to the time which he had determined from the wise men" (verse 16).




This massacre in Bethlehem was not out of character for Herod, who also had many members of his family put to death: “Herod in his rage over his family rivalries and jealousies put to death the two sons of Mariamne [his wife] (Aristobulus and Alexander), Mariamne herself, and Antipater, another son and once his heir, besides the brother and mother of Mariamne (Aristobulus, Alexandra) and her grandfather John Hyrcanus." (Word Pictures in the New Testament, Bible Explorer Software, 1997).




The New Testament description of Herod the Great is thus confirmed by what historians and archaeologists have found concerning his rulership, building projects, political strength and uncontrollable wrath toward anyone threatening his kingship.




The Census of Caesar Augustus




Luke, a meticulous historian, introduces other famous personages in his account of the birth of Christ. "And it came to pass in those days that a decree went out from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be registered … So all went to be registered, everyone to his own city" (Luke 2:1-3).




Ancient papyrus census decrees have been found for the years 20, 34, 48, 62 and 104. These show a wide-ranging census normally took place every 14 years, although local counts were, at times, taken more frequently. A papyrus in the British Museum describes a census similar to Luke's account, taken in 104, in which people were ordered to return to their birthplaces: "Gaius Vibius Mazimus, Prefect of Egypt: Seeing that the time has come for the house to house census, it is necessary to compel all those ... to return to their own homes, that they may both carry out the regular order of the census and may also attend diligently to the cultivation of their allotments" (Frederick G. Kenyon, Greek Papyri in the British Museum, 1907, plate 30).




Joseph's Occupation in Nazareth




Joseph was a skilled craftsman who worked not only with wood, but with stone masonry. The usual term translated as "carpenter" in the Bible (Mark 6:3) is from the Greek term ‘tekton’, which has the broader meaning of 'artisan,' referring to a skilled worker who works on hard material such as wood or stone or even horn or ivory. “In Jesus' day construction workers were not as highly specialized as in today's workforce. For example, the tasks performed by carpenters and masons could easily overlap" (Richard A. Batey, Jesus & the Forgotten City: New Light on Sepphoris and the Urban World of Jesus, p. 76).




Although Nazareth was a small village in Galilee of no more than a few hundred inhabitants, Joseph and Jesus likely found steady work in the city of Sepphoris four miles away, where huge construction projects were transforming the city into a large, regional centre.




Recent archaeological excavations in Sepphoris show it to have been a bustling, prosperous city during the years Jesus grew up in nearby Nazareth. Shirley Jackson Case, professor of New Testament at the University of Chicago, remarks “.... It requires no very daring flight of the imagination to picture the youthful Jesus seeking and finding employment in the neighboring city of Sepphoris. But whether or not he actually labored there, his presence in the city on various occasions can scarcely be doubted..." (Batey, pp. 70-71).




These historical records help us better understand the background of Christ's teachings, which included illustrations drawn not just from farming and animal husbandry, but also construction, rulers and nobility, the theater, government, finance and other aspects of city life.

Comments (1)

  • Victoria

    Victoria

    31 December 2021 at 08:07 |
    The Bible is a powerful book of the teachings of God. I accept that, but I hardly understand most of it.

    reply

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